allthingseurope:

Baranów Sandomierski Castle, Poland (by PolandMFA)

allthingseurope:

Baranów Sandomierski Castle, Poland (by PolandMFA)

3 hours ago with 1,012 notes — via allthingseurope



allthingseurope:

Villa D’ Este, Cernobbio, Italy (by Travelive)

allthingseurope:

Villa D’ Este, Cernobbio, Italy (by Travelive)

3 hours ago with 654 notes — via allthingseurope



allthingseurope:

Bode Museum, Berlin (by Nomadic Vision Photography)

allthingseurope:

Bode Museum, Berlin (by Nomadic Vision Photography)

3 hours ago with 1,083 notes — via allthingseurope



nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

3 hours ago with 2,794 notes — via fyerluna, © nannaia



bookshop:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though
why was there temporary internet
with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!
In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).
In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.


I just love that this post happened to find the ONE HUMAN ON THE INTERNET who had the answer to this question

bookshop:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!

In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).

In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

I just love that this post happened to find the ONE HUMAN ON THE INTERNET who had the answer to this question

3 hours ago with 216,630 notes — via shrikestrike, © neilcicierega



mgleonard:

We need to talk about Wesley Fleming, a gifted glass sculptor from Pennsylvania who makes beautiful glass beetles.

Me want one.

3 hours ago with 136 notes — via shrikestrike, © mgleonard



geek-studio:

Cosmic Crescent Moon Wand by StarlightDecoDream

geek-studio:

Cosmic Crescent Moon Wand by StarlightDecoDream

4 hours ago with 489 notes — via geek-studio



tastefullyoffensive:

[threepanelsoul]

4 hours ago with 89,210 notes — via heathazehero, © tastefullyoffensive



Time to buy your mooncakes before they sell out~ (Sep.8th is Mid-autumn)

Here’re some styles of mooncakes and their origins. 

1-2 广式月饼 Cantonese Mooncake (Guangdong; Key words: Most Popular; Classic)

3-4 提浆月饼 Tijiang Mooncake (Beijing; thicker skin than Cantonese style; Beijing style also has Zilai Hong and Zilai Bai)

5-6 苏式月饼 Suzhou Mooncake (Suzhou, Jiangsu; the skin has soft layers and it has the fullest fillings out of all the mooncakes; personal favorite)

7    潮式月饼 Teochew Mooncake (Chaozhou, Guangdong; skin also has layers but very crunchy)

8    Cantonese Mooncakes come in various shapes, the most popular is the lucky double fish.

Above are some traditional style mooncakes. Here’re also two popular new varieties inspired by the Cantonese mooncake.   

9   桃山皮月饼 Momoyama Mooncake (Japan) 

10 冰皮月饼 Snow skin mooncake (Hong Kong)

4 hours ago with 1,539 notes — via zerachin, © mingsonjia



prospit-laughssassin:

butt-of-glory:

korkrunchcereal:

princesparklypants:

thebiggestplottwist:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

What hoard would you have?

If there’s a dragon with a kitty hoard or a donut hoard, then yeah, those are me. 

Would it kill you to source the artist?

The Dragon hoarding cheese knows where it’s at.

jessipalooza look you’re on this.

iguanamouth:  UNUSUAL HOARD commission for bezzingtons, undoubtedly the best one so far  bonus

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iguanamouth:  UNUSUAL HOARD commission for flamiekitten featuring their oc and 47 birds

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I have a spiritual connection with like 5 of these dragons

5 hours ago with 74,150 notes — via aringofsalt, © iguanamouth